About

About OLSUME

Mathematics education is home to a great deal of innovation and thoughtful experimentation, happening in every category of higher educational institution. A variety of events have made it clear that the variety of work being done in this arena was not being adequately represented. Outside the discipline, mathematics was often regarded as an educational backwater. Educational innovations in mathematics departments were often not communicated.

Most sizable mathematics departments have several weekly seminars focusing on research areas of interest to faculty. Why not a mathematics education seminar? Most mathematics departments at this point do not have a critical mass of faculty who identify with teaching the way they identify with their mathematical specialty. Inspiration came from the example of the “Electronic Computational Homotopy Theory” seminar created by Dan Isaksen: Try an online seminar format.

Timeline
January 1, 2019

2017

Haynes Miller founded the Electronic Mathematics Education Seminar.

January 1, 2019
January 1, 2019

2018

Too many people assumed that EMES was a seminar about electronic mathematics education, so the name was changed to ESME, the Electronic Seminar on Mathematics Education.

January 1, 2019
January 1, 2019

2019

Tara Holm joined Haynes Miller as co-organizer.

January 1, 2019
January 1, 2019

2020

Support of ESME was taken on by TPSE-Math, Transforming Post-secondary Education in Mathematics, and subsequently the AMS and MAA joined as sponsors.

January 1, 2019
January 1, 2019

2021

A grant from TPSE funded construction of a new website, and with it a new name, reflecting the focus of the seminar more completely: The OnLine Seminar on Undergraduate Mathematics Education, OLSUME.

January 1, 2019
Meet the Organizers
Photo of Haynes Miller
Haynes Miller

Haynes Miller has been Professor of Mathematics at MIT since 1986. His research is in algebraic topology, and he has directed some thirty PhD theses in the subject. He has served as editor for eleven disciplinary journals, including as Managing Editor of the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Association. In 2005 he was named a MacVicar Faculty Fellow, the highest teaching honor at MIT. He created the MIT Mathlets — a collection of computer-based mathematical manipulatives, now seamlessly integrated into MITx mathematics courses — and the ongoing Online Seminar on University Mathematics Education. He is a core faculty supporter of the MIT-Haiti Initiative, a project promoting active learning and use in schools of Haitian Kreyòl.

Tara Holm

Tara Holm has been on the faculty at Cornell University since 2005. An expert in symplectic geometry, she has supervised four doctoral students and mentored many post docs and young researchers. She led the first Cornell Active Learning Initiative grant, transforming several courses to systematically use more engaged teaching techniques in math classrooms. She has been awarded both the 2017 Cook Award for mentoring and the 2019 Sze/Hernandez Teaching Prize at Cornell. Holm has chaired the AMS Committee on Education (2012—2016), serves on the Board of Governors of Transforming Post-Secondary Education in Mathematics, and is President of Pro Mathematica Arte, the non-profit corporation that connects students to mathematics study abroad programs in Budapest, Hungary.